The Waiting Game review by Honey Ayres

Order up! The chef is a tyrant, the customers demanding. And then you sight the woman you believe abandoned you as a baby. Get ready to savour a hearty communal plate of high drama, comedy and tension that will leave you deeply satisfied. The Waiting Game Review by Honey Ayres  performed on the 16 May […]

Order up! The chef is a tyrant, the customers demanding. And then you sight the woman you believe abandoned you as a baby. Get ready to savour a hearty communal plate of high drama, comedy and tension that will leave you deeply satisfied.

The Waiting Game Review by Honey Ayres  performed on the 16 May 2019 at Cupo and Concept

The final show is 7pm, Wednesday the 22 May at the Daily Planet 228 Wickham street, Fortitude Valley

https://anywhere.is/listings/waiting/

As you wander into the theatrette at Cupo and Concept, you are personally greeted and seated by black tied waiters at one of the long industrial tables which form the theatre in the round. The actors continue to set the scene of the Glass Menagerie (or is it the Coffee Club at Carindale) with scene painting, and a brilliant café soundscape, which heightens many of the scenes throughout the production.

The Waiting Game written by Egan Sun-Bin centres around Hayden (Owen Green) a young man, a foster kid, trying to answer the biggest questions of his life – who am I? and why was I abandoned? Green delivers a powerful performance, jumping from narration to crowd interaction, from past to present, you quickly empathise with Hayden’s plight and care about what happens to this funny and sensitive young man.

The ensemble cast Sarah Jarvis and Dimitri Politis leap through a multitude of scenes with high intensity to quiet stillness, humour to pathos, from the school bullies to the daggy adoptive parents, teachers, chefs and children. Each character was faultless, and the speed that they transitioned roles and created scenes in different areas of the space was completely absorbing, and an absolute joy to watch the hilarious frenzy of roles.

The script is funny and intelligent, and feels autobiographical, the performances are sensitive and feel authentic including the concluding scenes with Charlotte Lewis as the Mother. The director has sculpted delicate and courageous performances delivered by the young energetic cast. Anyone who has at some point in their childhood felt like an outsider, will find a pure connection with the beating heart of this production. Undoubtedly The Waiting Game would be well received in larger theatres with bigger crowds; however it is the intimacy of the performances, the eye contact and crowd participation that makes The Waiting Game by The Reaction Theory a very special Anywhere show not to be missed.