The Ballad of Rosie Quinn REVIEW by Natasha Hayes

The Ballad of Rosie Quinn presented by Republic of Song reviewed by Natasha Hayes Presented in the Spring Hill Reservoirs which is a perfect venue as this story was set in the late 1800’s and the reservoirs were used at this time. Brisbane was very different then, convicts built most of the buildings in the CBD, […]

The Ballad of Rosie Quinn presented by Republic of Song reviewed by Natasha Hayes

Presented in the Spring Hill Reservoirs which is a perfect venue as this story was set in the late 1800’s and the reservoirs were used at this time.

Brisbane was very different then, convicts built most of the buildings in the CBD, the wealthy lived in luxury and those who did not obey the rules of their master were beaten with lashes.

Jo Willans has written a story about Rosie Quinn a young lady who is a nanny to one of the wealthy’s children.

Jo has written a story that is for all the senses except sight, yes we are blindfolded from the beginning to the end of the show which is only 40 mins

40 mins of magic, my imagination was left to experience what I was hearing rather than it it being “told” to me.

The voices were clear including the characters who spoke in an Irish accent.  I could “follow” what was happening without seeing so powerful at times the words and presence of the characters, I got shivers and flinched at the words.

The occasional music that was played carried all through the Reservoir and felt very spooky (In a good way).

It was lovely to use my other senses that often get overlooked and a reminder that that if you lose your sight you can still “see” the story in front of you or in this case beside you, behind you and everything in between.

Well done to  the cast too as I expected when I did take off my blindfold they would be dressed in character but no they were all in black clothes so yes you can be someone else without a costume or make up.

This was reviewed for the 20.05.2018 performance